Household Safety:Preventing Burns,
Shocks, and Fires

Steps To Avoid Fire
and Burn Risks

Take a fire escape plan with two ways out of the house, plus a designated meeting place once out of the house. Practice the fire escape plan regularly.

Keep an emergency ladder on upper floors of your home in the event of a fire. Keep the ladder in or near the room of an adult or older child capable of using it.

Make sure you have a smoke alarm on every level of your home and in each bedroom. Test smoke alarms monthly and remember to change the batteries twice a year. Replace smoke alarms that are 10 years or older.

Install a fire extinguisher in the kitchen and know how to use it.

Keep matches, lighters, chemicals, and lit candles out of kids' reach.

Don't smoke inside, especially when you're tired, taking medication that can cause you to be drowsy, or in bed.

Factors About Shock

An electric shock occurs when a person comes into contact with an electrical energy source. Electrical energy flows through a portion of the body causing a shock. Exposure to electrical energy may result in no injury at all or may result in devastating damage or death. Adolescents and adults are prone to high voltage shock caused by mischievous exploration and exposure at work. About 1,000 people in the United States die each year as a result of electrocution. Most of these deaths are related to on-the-job injuries.

Low voltage electricity (less than 500 volts) does not normally cause significant injury to humans. Exposure to high voltage electricity (greater than 500 volts) has the potential to result in serious damage.

If you are going to help someone who has sustained a high voltage shock, you need to be very careful that you don't become a second victim of a similar electrical shock.

Children are not often seriously injured by electricity. They are prone to shock by the low voltage (110-220 volts) found in typical household current. In children aged 12 years and younger, household appliance electrical cords and extension cords caused more than 63% of injuries in one study. Wall outlets were responsible for 15% of injuries.

Household Tips
Tips on How to Improve
Electrical Safety at Home:
  1. Make visual checks to your electrics with professional help.
  2. Take great care with your DIY. DIY attempts result in nearly half of all severe electric shocks in the home. This DIY electrical safety guide explains how to avoid electric shocks in the process
  3. Remain vigilant in the kitchen. Misuse of kitchen appliances is just one of the many electrical safety no-nos in the home.
  4. Remember that water and electricity are a deadly mix. The bathroom can be one of the most dangerous rooms in the house when it comes to electrical safety.
  5. Don’t use electrical gardening equipment outdoors until it is dry.
  6. Take the necessary precautions after a flood. If your home has been flooded, there is a high chance the electrics could be damaged.
  7. Exercise caution to prevent electrical fires

Resources:

  • https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/safety-burns.html
  • https://www.humanics-es.com/burns.pdf
  • https://kfblaw.com/news/landlord-responsible-burn-injury/
  • https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=facts-about-burn-injury-90-P02796
  • https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/electric-shock#1
  • https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/electric-shock
  • https://www.health24.com/Lifestyle/Healthy-home/Living-areas/Is-your-heater-a-killer-20140603
  • https://www.injuryclaimcoach.com/apartment-building-insurance.html
  • https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Top-causes-of-fire/Electrical/Tamper-resistant-electrical-receptacles
  • https://www.naahq.org/july-2015/avoiding-chemical-spills
  • https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/guidance/safety-around-the-home/
  • https://real-estate-law.freeadvice.com/real-estate-law/landlord_tenant/landlord-liability.htm
  • https://gringosabroad.com/electric-showers-are-they-safe-how-shocking/
  • https://arma.org.uk/downloader/bf8/ESC_Guidance_Communal_Areas.pdf
  • https://www.resolvebylowes.com/guidance/fire/top-five-most-common-areas-in-your-home-where-fires-start/115000977412
  • https://www.rospa.com/home-safety/advice/general/preventing-accidents-in-the-home/
  • https://www.thehartford.com/about-us/junior-fire-marshal/apartment-fire-safety
  • https://www.usfa.fema.gov/data/statistics/
  • https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/statistics/v18i5.pdf
  • https://www.safewise.com/blog/safety-hazards-to-watch-out-for-around-the-house/
  • http://www.flat-living.co.uk/advice/700-12-of-apartment-blocks-under-serious-fire-hazard-threat
  • http://www.klawnyc.com/common-apartment-safety-hazards/
  • https://www.firerescue1.com/fire-attack/articles/761339-How-to-attack-townhouse-fires/
  • https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Data-research-and-tools/US-Fire-Problem
  • https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Data-research-and-tools/US-Fire-Problem/Fire-deaths-by-state

For More Information Download the PDF Guide

Download Guide
Book
  • https://kidshealth.org/en/parents/safety-burns.html
  • https://www.humanics-es.com/burns.pdf
  • https://kfblaw.com/news/landlord-responsible-burn-injury/
  • https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/en/topic/default?id=facts-about-burn-injury-90-P02796
  • https://www.webmd.com/a-to-z-guides/electric-shock#1
  • https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/healthyliving/electric-shock
  • https://www.health24.com/Lifestyle/Healthy-home/Living-areas/Is-your-heater-a-killer-20140603
  • https://www.injuryclaimcoach.com/apartment-building-insurance.html
  • https://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Top-causes-of-fire/Electrical/Tamper-resistant-electrical-receptacles
  • https://www.naahq.org/july-2015/avoiding-chemical-spills
  • https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/guidance/safety-around-the-home/
  • https://real-estate-law.freeadvice.com/real-estate-law/landlord_tenant/landlord-liability.htm
  • https://gringosabroad.com/electric-showers-are-they-safe-how-shocking/
  • https://arma.org.uk/downloader/bf8/ESC_Guidance_Communal_Areas.pdf
  • https://www.resolvebylowes.com/guidance/fire/top-five-most-common-areas-in-your-home-where-fires-start/115000977412
  • https://www.rospa.com/home-safety/advice/general/preventing-accidents-in-the-home/
  • https://www.thehartford.com/about-us/junior-fire-marshal/apartment-fire-safety
  • https://www.usfa.fema.gov/data/statistics/
  • https://www.usfa.fema.gov/downloads/pdf/statistics/v18i5.pdf
  • https://www.safewise.com/blog/safety-hazards-to-watch-out-for-around-the-house/
  • http://www.flat-living.co.uk/advice/700-12-of-apartment-blocks-under-serious-fire-hazard-threat
  • http://www.klawnyc.com/common-apartment-safety-hazards/
  • https://www.firerescue1.com/fire-attack/articles/761339-How-to-attack-townhouse-fires/
  • https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Data-research-and-tools/US-Fire-Problem
  • https://www.nfpa.org/News-and-Research/Data-research-and-tools/US-Fire-Problem/Fire-deaths-by-state

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